PROGRAMME

Technology is reshaping how the finance sector works, in terms of both opportunities and risks, and the pace of change is only going to increase. Machine learning, automation and artificial intelligence engines are already being used to analyse financial data and trends and to take decisions about investments and prioritised resource allocation.

New technology platforms for audit, investment, peer-to-peer lending, and financial management are challenging the traditional big finance systems and ERP domination. All public service organisations are becoming ‘data driven’.

These new technologies and a focus on data will arguably replace many traditional accounting functions, putting financial controls in the hands of business leaders and automating pattern analysis and financial planning. But how are these trends affecting the public sector today? When and how will they impact, and what does it mean for current practices, skills and roles?


11 JULY

Registration

Time: 08:15 - 09:15

Welcome to CIPFA Annual Conference 2018


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President's welcome

Time: 09:15 - 09:30


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What prolonged Brexit negotiations mean for public spending and economic growth

Time: 09:30 - 10:40

The prolonged uncertainty of Brexit negotiations and the Government’s weakened majority in the Commons present two historic challenges for the UK’s economic recovery. The Chancellor’s commitment to contingency funding for Brexit leaves precious little wriggle room for public spending.

Economic growth is predicted to weaken further in 2018 and 2019. Higher inflation is limiting household purchasing power. The unemployment rate is at a record low, but doubts remain over the nature and security of the work for many. Meanwhile high consumer debt growth coupled with stagnant incomes, is a major financial stability risk. Austerity looks set to be with us for the long run, leading economist and commentators look at what this means for the public mood and public finances.


chair:

Andrew Rawnsley

Chief Political Commentator and Associate Editor

The Observer

speaker:

Gemma Tetlow

Chief Economist

Institute for Government

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10:40-11:20 - Refreshment break in the exhibition hall

Public Expectations in the Age of Social Media

Time: 11:20 - 11:45

10 years after the beginning of the financial crisis began the public’s expectations of government have been spectacularly re-calibrated. What people expect and how it has been affected by social media has been transformed, and what they want, need and expect from public services, has had to adapt along with living standards along the way. This most recent analysis underscores the importance of understanding public priorities and the trade-offs the public are willing to make, more than ever in a time when tough choices will continue to be made on public spending.


chair:

Andrew Rawnsley

Chief Political Commentator and Associate Editor

The Observer

speaker:

Ben Page

Chief Executive

Ipsos MORI

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Mapping a Digital Future

Time: 11:45 - 12:15

The UK is ideally positioned to take advantage of new technologies to improve the efficiency of government and public services. Not only will these developments improve the effectiveness of public services, the tech sector is rapidly growing into a nationally distributed economic powerhouse, generating wealth, creating jobs and delivering cutting edge technologies such as artificial intelligence and ‘fintech’ to improve the way we live our lives. This ecosystem of innovation in fintech and artificial intelligence presents a brilliant opportunity for the UK’s economy to attract global investment into the UK’s digital economy for many years to come.

How can local and national government support and take advantage of these developing technologies to improve local economies, create opportunity and deliver services more effectively?


chair:

Andrew Rawnsley

Chief Political Commentator and Associate Editor

The Observer

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12:15-13:30 - Lunch

Lunchtime workshop 1

Time: 12:30 - 13:15

Workshops

Time: 13:30 - 14:30

14:30-15:10 - Refreshment break in the exhibition hall

Workshops

Time: 15:10 - 16:10

Smarter, faster, stronger: Devolution and digital

Time: 16:20 - 17:20

While the government has articulated its vision for wider devolution, it has not yet considered how digital could help aid devolution by empowering
regions and making them smarter and more effective.

How can digital support the devolution agenda to ensure it results in more effective and efficient services?

One area of the South West has the highest turnover per worker in digital tech firms in the country – with over 35,924 digital jobs in the Bristol and
Bath cluster, and 225 new digital companies being started there each year. How can we ensure national and local investment strategies across the
UK produce the vibrant economies needed to recharge the UK’s flagging productivity?

 


chair:

Andrew Rawnsley

Chief Political Commentator and Associate Editor

The Observer

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Close of day 1

Time: 17:20 - 17:20


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18:00-19:30 - Drinks Reception at Aruba bar and restaurant - Sponsored by Grant Thornton

12 JULY

Breakfast Workshops

Time: 08:30 - 09:15

President's Welcome

Time: 09:30 - 09:35

 

 


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Mapping the Digital State

Time: 09:35 - 10:35

Finance leaders are being forced to reimagine their role in direct response to digital disruption, increasing volumes of data, ongoing
regulatory change and stakeholder scrutiny. How can CFOs use this moment to design the future state, how does the finance function
need to respond and define its future role in a digital world. Finance professionals have a growing opportunity to play a significant
leadership role in strategic business planning and in wider resource management arising from digital change.


chair:

Anita Anand

News and Politics Broadcaster

speaker:

Matthew Taylor

Chief Executive

RSA

Joanna Davinson

Chief Digital, Data and Technology Officer

Home Office

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10:35-11:10 - Refreshment break in the exhibition hall

A crisis of corporate governance and a failed market: where next for outsourcing?

Time: 11:10 - 12:10

Examples like the Carillion, the collapse of Southern Cross, and troubling concerns about Capita have been raising serious questions
about the governance, oversight and sustainability of a market that the state has grown reliant on.

The Work and Pensions and BEIS Committees have launched a new joint inquiry into the collapse of Carillion, leaving a mountain of
debt, potential job losses in the thousands, a giant pension deficit and hundreds of millions of pounds of unfinished public contracts
with vast on-going costs to the UK taxpayer. The Committees will be investigating how a company that was signed off by KPMG as a
going concern in Spring 2017 could crash into liquidation with a reported £5bn of liabilities and just £29 million left in cash less than a
year later.


chair:

Anita Anand

News and Politics Broadcaster

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12:10-13:15 - Lunch in the Exhibition Hall

Workshops

Time: 13:15 - 14:15

14:15-14:45 - Refreshment break in the exhibition hall

Thinking about the Digital Future

Time: 14:45 - 15:30

James Woudhuysen is a journalist and author of several books. Currently Visiting Professor at London South Bank University and previously Professor of Forecasting and Innovation at De Montfort University, Leicester. James has a knack of registering trends before other people, and offering counter-intuitive proposals on what to do about those trends. His diverse contributions span five decades, including helping to install and test Britain’s first computer-controlled car park in 1968; co-directing Britain’s first major study into the future of e-commerce in the 1980s; working for the Henley Centre, building up the firm’s forecasting on the broader future of IT; and influencing UK government policy in favour of the mass production of housing.


chair:

Anita Anand

News and Politics Broadcaster

speaker:

James Woudhuysen

Visiting Professor of Forecasting and Innovation

London South Bank University

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Development and Key Asset Strategies

Time: 15:30 - 16:15

Housing and other property are key assets offering local communities the opportunity to provide both revenue streams and vital services, delivering both essential social and economic impacts, raising income, mitigating risk, creating homes, growing businesses, jobs, and environmental benefit. Government is at last shifting its longstanding opposition to local authorities’ development and management of social housing, meanwhile STPs are looking to break down the barriers between sectors and utilise their substantial assets more effectively.

Now there is political will – how do we go about delivering and funding the major shift required to deliver a million new homes and what will the look like?


chair:

Anita Anand

News and Politics Broadcaster

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16:15 - Conference Close