Robust public financial management (PFM) plays a crucial role in the delivery of public services. Central to PFM is the concept of the effective and efficient use of public resources, it provides leaders and managers with information for better decision making, and it helps provide better targeted services. Good PFM ensures the taxpayer gets better value for money.

CIPFA’s 2017 annual conference international sessions will be looking at the progress being made around the work in the adoption by governments of accruals accounting and reporting including strengthening PFM systems in fragile states. We will be revealing, in the findings of new research, how the role of the CFO is developing in global cities. And in the disruptive environment of the digital age asking how can citizens truly hold government to account, and can the availability of increasing quantities of data and the ability to analyse it speedily and accurately really improve the performance of public services and social outcomes?

International programme

PLEASE NOTE CIPFA RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ALTER THE PROGRAMME, SCHEDULE AND CONTENT AT ANY TIME

WEDNESDAY 12 JULY

08.30 – 09.15 REGISTRATION

09.15 – 09.30 PRESIDENT’S WELCOME

Speaker: Andrew Burns, Director of Finance and Resources, Staffordshire County Council and President, CIPFA

09.30 – 10.40 PREPARING FOR BREXIT BRITAIN – A COUNTRY IN WHICH NO ONE IS LEFT OUT

Chair: Samira Ahmed, Journalist and Broadcaster

Speakers: Philip Collins, Chief Leader Writer and columnist, The Times

Andrew Lilico, Director and Principal, Europe Economics

Grace Blakeley, IPPR North

The EU referendum result exposed deep divisions across the country, similar rifts are evident in Europe and the USA. Echoing Franklin D Roosevelt’s New Deal, Prime Minister Theresa May has responded by calling for a more cohesive society and inclusive economy.

The UK is entering a period of negotiation with the EU that will determine the direction not just of the economy but the very nature of its relationship with the rest of the world and its own citizens. The outcome of those negotiations will determine the sustainability of many public services which depend on both healthy public finances and an available pool of labour. Striking the right balance in those negotiations will be critical.

Critical to the success of that ambition will be the extent to which the UK adopts a new inclusive approach to economic and regional development: combining economic development with social action, growing productivity and building social capital for communities to prosper with shared norms and values.

Topics covered: social cohesion, economic development, productivity

10.40 – 11.20 COFFEE AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

11.20 – 12.15 HEALTH, WELLBEING AND EFFICIENCY

Chair: Samira Ahmed, Journalist and Broadcaster

Speakers: Jim Mackey, CEO, NHS Improvement

Niall Dickson, CEO, NHS Confederation

In January 2016, across England, local health and care systems came together in 44 groupings to deliver plans based on the needs of local populations. The health and care organisations within these geographic footprints are working together to develop sustainability and transformation plans (STPs), which will help drive genuine and sustainable transformation in patient experience and health outcomes over the longer term. What will be required across the NHS-local authority divide to make place-based planning a reality and achieve financial balance for the NHS?

Topics covered: STPs, placed base planning

12.15 – 13.30 LUNCH AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

13.30 – 14.30 WORKSHOP 1E: CHANGING ROLE OF THE FINANCE PROFESSIONAL

Sponsored by: Workday

Chair: Brendan McCarron, CIPFA

Speakers: Paul Clarke, Head of Finance, London Borough of Barnet
Roger Ermuth, Assistant Comptroller General, Canada
Mark Nittler, Vice President, Workday
Betty Sturgeon, Deputy Director, People and Capability, Government Finance Academy

Finance professionals are working on a greater variety of activities as service provision becomes more complicated.
The finance function of the future will be defined by flexibility and adaptive process, increasing levels of automation and real-time reporting, exponentially more data available will demand skills in predictive analytics. Finance will be at the centre of organisational performance and to deliver will mean responding to transformational pressures and in public services an entirely new level of entrepreneurship and commercialism.

14.30 – 15.10 COFFEE AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

15.10 – 16.10 Global cities and the role of the CFO

Chair: Jayne Stephenson, Director of Finance (Police & Crime), Greater Manchester Combined Authority

Speakers: Caroline Al Beyerty, Deputy Chamberlain, City of London Corporation

Marike Bonhof, Chief Financial Officer, Amsterdam

Richard Holt, Head of Global Cities Research, Oxford Economics

Marcel Holder Robinson, Finance Policy Manager, CIPFA

As global cities grow larger and more complex, so the role of the city chief financial officer is developing. Commercial skills, a facility with data and working with business to foster growth are all increasingly important requirements. A new definition of the future CFO is emerging.

Cities generate more than 60% of global GDP and house more than 50% of the world’s population. While rapid urbanisation can lift populations out of poverty, it can also exacerbate poor health, environmental hazards and inequality. Strong institutions and frameworks will help local governments create the conditions for success.

Topics covered: CFO role, leadership, data & analytics, commercial skills

16.20 – 17.25 DEVELOPING PRODUCTIVITY AND HUMAN CAPITAL

Chair: Samira Ahmed, Journalist and Broadcaster

Speakers: Mike Blackburn OBE, Chair, Manchester LEP
Vicky Pryce, Board member Centre for Economics and Business Research, former Director General for

Economics at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and Chief economist at KPMG
The government is committed to boost productivity by investing in human capital. As part of this, it is committed to developing vocational skills, and to increasing the quantity and quality of apprenticeships.

To address the perennial issue of low productivity it will be essential to improve standards of education and training, from primary to tertiary and vocational, to ensure that businesses have access to the skills and talents they need to prosper. How will government nationally and locally ensure young people receive guidance and support to take full advantage of education, training and employment opportunities? And, for those who are unemployed, how do we develop more effective approaches to supporting people back into work?

Topics covered: education skills productivity growth

18.00 – 20.00 CONFERENCE DRINKS RECEPTION

Sponsored by: Grant Thornton

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Please join us along with delegates, sponsors and exhibitors for the official conference drinks reception.

Venue: Revolucion de Cuba

Address: 11 Peter Street, Manchester, M2 5QR

Website: www.revoluciondecuba.com/bar/manchester/

THURSDAY 13 JULY

08.15 – 09.30 REGISTRATION

08.30 – 09.15 BREAKFAST WORKSHOP – THE ONLY WAY IS ETHICS

Chair: Margaret Pratt, Past President, CIPFA

Speakers: Anton Colella, Chief Executive, ICAS
Maggie Oliver, Former Detective Constable, Greater Manchester Police

As public finance professionals face every greater challenges through budget cuts and alternative ways of working, ethical dilemmas become more common. Whether being asked to balance the unbalanceable or issue an audit opinion with insufficient resources, this session will hear of recent real life case studies and seek to discuss how best such difficult situations can be addressed.

As CIPFA seeks to redraft its current ethics guidance and looks at how best it can support its members, this session will allow delegates a chance to contribute to those increasingly relevant discussions.

09.15 – 09.30 PRESIDENT’S WELCOME

Speaker: Andrew Burns, Director of Finance and Resources, Staffordshire County Council and President, CIPFA

09.35 – 10.35 PLACES WHERE BUSINESS CAN THRIVE

Chair: Simon Jack, Broadcast Journalist

Speakers: John Dickie, Director of Strategy and Policy, London First and Global Cities Business Alliance

Richard Holt, Head of Global Cities Research, Oxford Economics

How cities and regions interact with businesses will be a key determinant of local growth. Having clear and aligned strategic priorities and a shared agenda will ensure that the public sector and businesses work together for the benefit of the community. This will require transparency and openness from locally elected leaders and executives. Communities must tap into the expertise of business to help government unlock its place based potential; and together they need to take a long-term view of relationships. So how do local government and businesses deliver transformation and sustainable economic development that benefits both sides and improves wider social outcomes?

10.35 – 11.10 COFFEE AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

11.10 – 12.10 ACCRUAL ADOPTION AT THE CENTRE OF PFM REFORM

Chair: Roger Ermuth, Assistant Comptroller General, Canada 

Speakers: Ian Carruthers, Chair, International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB)

Vincent Tophoff, Senior Technical Manager, International Federation of Accountants

Atul Kumar Gupta, The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India

As IPSASB celebrates its 20th birthday, the workshop launches a new index of accrual adoption in governments globally, together with CIPFA’s new PFM portal and its revised Whole System Approach to PFM. The practical benefits of accrual adoption are then examined through a case study of the cash-to-accrual transition in one of the world’s largest organisations.

12.15 – 13.15 LUNCH AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

13.15 – 14.15 Building capacity and resilience in fragile states

Chair: Ian Carruthers, Chair, International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB)

Speakers: Chris Austin, lately DFID Country Director, British Embassy Afghanistan

David Watkins, IMF Panel of Experts and Technical Adviser IPSASB

The challenges of building capacity and resilience in PFM and governance in states affected by recent or ongoing conflict, economic shocks, natural disasters, or political and financial corruption cannot be overstated. Drawing on the experience of those working on the ground in-country, we take a look at how CIPFA members with other global bodies are building PFM capacity and capability in countries like Afghanistan, Zimbabwe and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

14.15 – 14.45 COFFEE AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

14.45 – 15.35 (RE)BUILDING PUBLIC TRUST IN GOVERNMENT

Chair: Simon Jack, Broadcast Journalist

Speakers: Theresa Grafenstine, Inspector General, US House of Representatives and Board of Directors, Association of International Certified Professional Accountants (AICPA)

Bernard Jenkin, Conservative MP for Harwich and North Essex, Chair of the Public Administration Select Committee 2010-2017

We live in an era increasingly characterised by a decline in public trust in government. The rise of social media, suspicion around fake news, alternative facts, media manipulation and the associated risk to personal privacy all contribute to a new sense that traditional norms of accountability and transparency are being undermined.

Theresa Grafenstine, Inspector General of the US House of Representatives will address how, in the disruptive environment of the digital age citizens can truly hold government to account? She asks can the ready availability of more and more data and the ability to analyse it speedily and accurately really improve the performance of public services and social outcomes?

In the light of the recent PACAC report Accounting for democracy its former chair Bernard Jenkin will look at how Parliament, the people and ministers know how and why public money is spent.

Topics covered: digital, data, social media, trust, transparency

15.35 – 16.20 NEXT GENERATION CFO

Chair: Simon Jack, Broadcast Journalist

Speakers: Anton Colella, Chief Executive, ICAS

Joy Thomas, CEO, CPA Canada

Matt Miller, Finance Director, BAE Systems

Finance professionals are working on a greater variety of activities as service provision becomes more complicated.

The finance function of the future will be defined by flexibility and adaptive process, increasing levels of automation and real-time reporting, while a huge increase in available data will demand skills in predictive analytics. Finance will be at the centre of organisational performance and to deliver will mean responding to transformational pressures and in public services an entirely new level of entrepreneurship and commercialism.